SERVICES INFO-BLOG

FORMALDELHYDE SYNONYMS

Posted on June 10, 2010 at 10:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Synonyms:

Formaldehyde 37%; Gluteraldehyde, and Glyoxal

Formalin;

Morbicid Acid;

Methylene Oxide; Methylaldehyde

DMDM hydantoin

SALIDANT PLUS

1,3-Dioxetane (1,3-dioxacyclobutane)

Formic Aldehyde; Methanal; Oxymethane;

Oxymethyline;

Quaternium 15;

Phenol Formaldehyde;

Urea

Oxomethane Formalin

Forms of formaldehyde

Metheneamine

Metheneamine is a chemical and antibacterial agent that belongs to the hormone-disrupting family of chemicals found in body wash, shampoos, facial cleansers, liquid soaps, and shower gels. The other names of Metheneamine are Urotropin, Cystogen, Ammoform, and Ammonioformaldehyde. Metheneamine is proven formaldehyde releaser.

Formaldehyde releasers decompose rapidly to release formaldehyde when dissolved in aqueous solvents. Formaldehyde releasers are used as preservatives in many body and cleaning products. The CIR states that a formaldehyde presence of 0.2% is considered safe. I guess my concern is this: most people use multiple body products and cleaning products daily. For myself I use shampoo, conditioner, soaps, creams, cosmetics, and cleaning products daily.

Formaldehyde is more complicated than many simple carbon compounds because it adopts different forms.

Formaldehyde is a gas at room temperature, but the gas readily converts to a variety of derivatives.

These derivatives generally behave similarly to gaseous formaldehyde and are used in industry. One important derivative is the cycle compound trioxane, the "trimer" of formaldehyde with formula is (CH2O)3. When dissolved in water, formaldehyde converts to H2C(OH)2, a diol (i.e. a compound with two hydroxy groups).

Aqueous solutions of formaldehyde are referred to as formalin. "100%" formalin consists of a saturated solution of formaldehyde (this is about 40% by volume or 37% by mass) in water, with a small amount of stabilizer, usually methanol to limit oxidation and degree of polymerization.

A typical commercial grade formalin may contain 10–12% methanol in addition to various metallic impurities.

The diol also exists in equilibrium with a series of short polymers (called oligomers), depending on the concentration and temperature. The infinite polymer formed from formaldehyde is called paraformaldehyde.

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

DEPARTMENT of ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH and SAFETY

1

FORMALDEHYDE AWARENESS TRAINING

Substance: Formaldehyde

CAS Registry Number: 50-00-0

Synonyms: Formaldehyde 37%; Formalin; Morbicid Acid; Methylene Oxide, Methyl aldehyde

What is the hazard of Formaldehyde? Formaldehyde is a suspect cancer-causing

chemical. Formaldehyde can also cause irritation to the skin, eyes, and respiratory

tract. It is a strong sensitizer; meaning that it can cause allergic reactions of the skin or

respiratory tract. It may be fatal or cause blindness if swallowed. The liquid and vapor

of formaldehyde are flammable. The adverse effects of exposure to formaldehyde are

related to the level and duration of exposure.

Where can Formaldehyde be found in our workplace? Formaldehyde is commonly

used in our research and anatomy laboratories as a tissue preservative. The stock

solutions can be found usually in glass or plastic bottles on shelves or in cabinets in our

laboratories. Working solutions may be found in tubes or bottles on lab benches, in

fume hoods or in refrigerators. Formaldehyde is also a component of embalming

solutions used to preserve cadavers.

How may I become exposed to Formaldehyde? Exposure to Formaldehyde may

occur by inhaling the vapors, ingesting the liquid or coming in contact (skin or eye

contact) with the liquid vapor.

How may I protect myself from exposure to Formaldehyde? You can protect

yourself from exposure by following the specific laboratory procedures established by

your Principal Investigator for using Formaldehyde. Read the Material Safety Data

Sheet for Formaldehyde before you begin your work. The best way to protect your self

is to use a less hazardous chemical. If this is not possible, use the lowest concentration

of Formaldehyde possible. Formalin is a 10% Formaldehyde solution and can be used

as a preservative. The next best way of protecting yourself is to learn how to work

safely with Formaldehyde. In general, engineering controls such as a properly

operating fume hood are better at protecting a worker than personal protective

equipment such as a respirator, gloves, etc. Work with Formaldehyde must always be

done in a properly working fume hood so that the vapors are directed away from your

breathing zone. You should also wear safety goggles, nitrile gloves and a buttoned lab

coat. Opened toed shoes, sandals, or short pants must not be worn when working with

Formaldehyde. Eating, drinking, or applying cosmetics is not permitted in our

laboratories. After the completion of your work with Formaldehyde, remove your

personal protective equipment and wash your hands thoroughly. All bottles and

containers with Formaldehyde must be clearly labeled. This is also the case for waste

containers with Formaldehyde. Formaldehyde waste disposal is through the

Department of Environmental Health and Safety by completing a Hazardous Waste Pick

Up Form and faxing it or mailing it to Forchheimer 800 or by completing a form on the

EH&S web site: www.aecom.yu.edu/ehs

Formaldehyde

Description:

Formaldehyde (C.A.S. 50-00-0) is a colorless gas with a pungent, suffocating odor. It is often used in an aqueous solution. The primary uses for formaldehyde are for the production of urea-formaldehyde resins (25% produced), phenol- formaldehyde resins (20%), plastics (15%), and intermediates (22%). Urea-formaldehyde resins and phenol-formaldehyde resins are used primarily as adhesives in the manufacture of particle board, fiberboard, and plywood, and for molding, paper treating and coating, textile treating, surface coating, and foams for insulation. Most of the formaldehyde used for the production of intermediates is in the manufacture of acetylenic chemicals; smaller quantities are used in the production of entaerythritol, hexamethylenetetramine, and urea-formaldehyde concentrates.

Formaldehyde has miscellaneous uses in agriculture for seed treatment, soil disinfection, and as a insecticide and fungicide; as a reagent in analysis; to water- and grease-proof concrete and plaster; as a drying agent and preservative in cosmetics; in room fumigants; as a chemical intermediate for dyes, surface-active agents, and processing aids; in embalming as a preservative and hardener of tissues; in histopathology; as a biocide in drilling fluids; as a stabilizer in gasoline; in leather tanning; as a corrosion inhibitor in metal industries; in paper industries as a chemical intermediate for wet-strength and other paper treating resins; as a photographic film hardener; as a starch modifier; to modify fibers in textiles; and in wood preservatives.

Formaldehyde is also used as a treatment for athlete's foot, in cough drops, skin disinfectants, mouthwashes, spermaticide creams, as a disinfectant for vasectomies and root canals, and formerly to sterilize certain cysts prior to surgical removal. In veterinary medicine, it is used as an antiseptic and fumigant in the treatment of tympany, diarrhea, mastitis, pneumonia, and internal bleeding; in association with iodine; it is used as a coccidiostat in chickens.

Chemical properties:

Formaldehyde is a highly flammable gas or a combustible liquid. Vapors may travel to a source of ignition and flash back. Poisonous gases are produced if it catches on fire; containers of formaldehyde may explode in fire. Formaldehyde is miscible with water, acetone, benzene, diethyl ether, chloroform, and ethanol. It is incompatible and reactive with strong oxidizers, alkalis and acids, phenols, and urea. Pure formaldehyde has a tendency to polymerize. Formaldehyde has a short half-life in air because photochemical processes degrade it; it is unstable in water, and highly soluble in water. Formaldehyde is available in the United Sates as its cycle trimer, trioxane, and as paraformaldehyde. Trioxane is a crystalline solid with a chloroform-like odor. It is easily soluble in water, alcohols, ketones, ether, acetone, chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons, and other organic solvents. It is slightly soluble in pentane, petroleum ether, and lower paraffins. In nonaqueous systems, trioxane readily converts to monomeric formaldehyde. Paraformaldehyde is available as a powdered or flaked product containing the equivalent of 90-93% formaldehyde, a maximum of 9% water, and a maximum of .03% acidity as formic acid. It is soluble in fixed alkali hydroxide solutions, slowly soluble in cold water, more readily soluble in hot water with evolution of formaldehyde vapors, and insoluble in alcohol and ether. Synonyms for gaseous formaldehyde are methanal, methyl aldehyde, and methylene oxide. A synonym for aqueous solution formaldehyde is formalin.

Identification:

Chemical Name: Formaldehyde

Regulatory Name: Formaldehyde

Formula: (HCHO)

CAS: 50-00-0

STCC: 4966365

UN Number: 3077

Health effects:

Formaldehyde gas is classified as a substance which may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen, according to the Sixth Annual Report on Carcinogens, 1991, published by the National Toxicology Program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is classified as a carcinogen in the Environmental Protection Agency's Toxic Release Inventory (TRI). The evidence for a possible involvement of formaldehyde in cancers is strongest for nasal and nasopharyngeal cancer, since the nose and nasopharynx come into direct contact with formaldehyde through inhalation. Exposure to formaldehyde irritates the eyes, nose, and throat, and can cause skin and lung allergies. Higher levels can cause throat spasms and a build-up of fluid in the lungs, leading to death. Contact can cause severe eye and skin burns, leading to permanent damage. These may appear hours after exposure, even if no pain is felt. Formaldehyde can cause an asthma-like allergy. Future exposures can cause asthma attacks with shortness of breath, wheezing, cough, and/or chest tightness. Repeated exposures may cause bronchitis, with symptoms of cough and shortness of breath.

Exposure Values:

IDLH: Ca 20 ppm. Not applicable for Formalin (as formaldehyde), a potential carcinogen. (NIOSH, 1997)

TLV STEL: 0.3 ppm Ceiling limit. Suspected human carcinogen (ACGIH, 1999)

ERPG-1: 1 ppm (AIHA, 1999)

ERPG-2: 10 ppm (AIHA, 1999)

ERPG-3: 25 ppm (AIHA, 1999)

NIOSH REL: Ca TWA 0.016 ppm C 0.1 ppm [15-minute]

OSHA PEL: TWA 0.75 ppm ST 2 ppm

Economics:

U.S. manufacturers of formaldehyde are: Borden Inc, Columbus, OH; BTL Specialty Resins Corp, Warren, NJ; Chembond Corp, Eugene, OR; D B Western, North Bend, OR; E I du Pont de Nemours & Co, Inc, Wilmington, DE; GAF Corp, Wayne, NJ; Georgia-Pacific Corp, Atlanta, GA; Hercules Incorporated, Wilmington, DE; Hoechst Celanese Corp, Somerville, NJ; International Minerals and Chemical Corp, Northbrook, IL; Monsanto Co, North St Louis, Mo.; RVP Corp, White City, OR ; Wright Chemical Corp, Riegelwood, NC.

Regulation:

Under the authority of the Federal Hazardous Substances Act, the Consumer Product Safety Commission requires warning labels on household products containing 1% or more of formaldehyde. It has also banned the use of urea-formaldehyde foam insulation in residences and schools.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issues permissible exposure limits for formaldehyde and regulates formaldehyde under the Hazard Communication Standard and as a chemical hazard in laboratories.

EPA regulates formaldehyde under the Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund); Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act; and Toxic Substances Control Act.

EPA has designated formaldehyde as a hazardous air pollutant, water pollutant, waste constituent, and inert ingredient of pesticide products.

Under Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act of 1986, releases of more than one pound of formaldehyde into the air, water, and land must be reported annually and entered into the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI).

Under Section 302 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, formaldehyde is listed as an Extremely Hazardous substance and has a threshold planning quantity of 500 pounds.

Facilities having a threshold quantity of 15000 pounds of formaldehyde are subject to the Risk Management Program Rule (RMP), Section 112r of the Clean Air Act. The RMP toxic endpoint for formaldehyde is 0.012 mg/L - basis ERPG-2.

OSHA lists formaldehyde as a highly hazardous chemical under the Process Safety Management Standard at a threshold quantity of 1000 pounds.

National Overview of 1998 Toxics Release Inventory

See EPA's Toxic Release Inventory.

Notations:

The NIOSH recommended exposure limits (RELs) are time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations for up to a 10-hour workday during a 40-hour workweek. A short-term exposure limit (STEL) is designated by "ST" preceding the value; unless noted otherwise, the STEL is a 15-minute TWA exposure that should not be exceeded at any time during a workday. A ceiling REL is designated by "C" preceding the value. Any substance that NIOSH considers to be a potential occupational carcinogen is designated by the notation "Ca."

The OSHA permissible exposure limits (PEL) are found in Tables Z-1, Z-2, and Z-3 of the OSHA General Industry Air Contaminants Standard (29 CFR 1910.1000). Unless noted otherwise, PEL are TWA concentrations that must not be exceeded during any 8-hour workshift of a 40-hour workweek. A STEL is designated by "ST" preceding the value and is measured over a 15-minute period unless noted otherwise. OSHA ceiling concentrations (designated by "C" preceding the value) must not be exceeded during any part of the workday; if instantaneous monitoring is not feasible, the ceiling must be assessed as a 15-minute TWA exposure. In addition, there are a number of substances from Table Z-2 (e.g., beryllium, ethylene dibromide, etc.) that have PEL ceiling values that must not be exceeded except for specified excursions. For example, a "5-minute maximum peak in any 2 hours" means that a 5-minute exposure above the ceiling value, but never above the maximum peak, is allowed in any 2 hours during an 8-hour workday.

Information Sources:

CAMEO®, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, www.epa.gov/ceppo.

Chemical Manufacturers Association, 1300 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22209: (703) 741-5000 or Chemical Referral Library, (800) 262-8200.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Clearinghouse on Environmental Health Effects, 100 Capitola Drive, #108, Durham, NC 27713; (800) 643-4794; fax (919) 361-9408.

TOXNET, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health; www.toxnet.nlm.nih.gov

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 401 M St., SW, Washington, DC 20460; Right to Know Hotline (800) 535-0202.

U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Health and Safety Administration, Washington, DC, www.osha.gov

OSHA PEL: Z-1 Table: www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_1000_TABLE_Z-1.html

OSHA PEL: Z-2 Table: www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_1000_TABLE_Z-2.html

Return to Index

April 2006

Originally published in Environment Writer by the National Safety Council. Reprinted with permission.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Environment Writer

Metcalf Institute for Marine and Environmental Reporting

University of Rhode Island

Graduate School of Oceanography

Office of Marine Programs

Narragansett, RI 02882

Tel: 401-874-6211; Fax: 401-874-6485

Disclaimer * Copyright 2002-2006 * All rights reserved. * University of Rhode Island

Formaldehyde is the primary cause of methanol's toxicity, since methanol is metabolised into toxic formaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase

THE TRUTH ABOUT KERATIN TREATMENTS BY QOD

Posted on June 10, 2010 at 10:35 PM Comments comments (4)

THE WINNER TO THE HONESTY !

Notes on Formaldehyde

In the U.S. market there is a great deal of confusion – and far too much false advertising - regarding Brazilian Keratin products and formaldehyde. Any professional stylist considering offering a Brazilian Keratin treatment will take the time and effort to get to the truth about these formulas, their potency and their effectiveness.

The Myth of “Formaldehyde Free”

There are a number of keratin formulas on the market claiming to be “formaldehyde free.” Technically, this may be correct. Many of these “formaldehyde free” products, however, are likely to contain other “aldehydes,” urea, or similar mixes which share the potent characteristics of formaldehyde. Often these compounds convert into a form of raw, unrefined formaldehyde when heated.

Even though QOD Brazilian Keratin formulas do not contain industrially manufactured raw formaldehyde, we choose not to advertise them as “formaldehyde free.” We find this to be a disingenuous marketing gimmick. More importantly, it is potentially harmful. If stylists are comforted with a false sense of confidence, believing that a product is “formaldehyde free,” they may not follow the same stringent safety protocols they would with other powerful salon products. That would be a mistake.

The bottom line is this:

Any formulation that produces a significant volume-reduction in the hair lasting several weeks is a potent salon product. It should always be treated with healthy respect, and handled in compliance with salon safety protocols by licensed hair professionals only.

There are no exceptions to this, and there are no short cuts to achieving the remarkable, long-lasting effects of a Brazilian Keratin treatment. If a product is truly without formaldehyde or any derivatives, its effects will most likely last only until the next washing. A beautiful flat-iron and blow-out with some nice keratin-based conditioner might last for several days and make a client happy - but this service is not a Brazilian Keratin treatment.

What is Different About QOD Brazilian Keratin?

At QOD COSMETIC, our approach is different. We have always focused on the technology rather than marketing hype, steadily reducing the levels of potent chemicals in our formulas while maintaining – and improving – their long-lasting conditioning and volume reduction effects.

We also respect our clientele, communicating with them frankly and directly about what is involved.

In the U.S. field of relative new-comers to the market, QOD COSMETIC USA stands apart. We have led the world in Brazilian Keratin products for over a decade, and are unique in our expertise. We have developed a cutting edge, patented technique that uses a proprietary compound of actively charged elements to work with the keratin for maximum penetration and effect. With QOD’s process, the ratio of potentially harmful chemicals in our keratin formulas goes way down. This is particularly true in the formulation of QOD GOLD. Click here to learn more...

Several products that have been very successful in the U.S market still rely on a low grade mix of raw, potent ingredients – sometimes coupled with a misleading marketing campaign. These formulas may be effective at volume reduction, but the treatment experience will be far less pleasant – and the results less optimal - than with a QOD formula that has been systematically refined through years of research and testing.

Communicating With Clients

Most of us have a greater level of awareness than ever before regarding chemical content and potential risk. QOD’s clients are no exception. You are forward-thinking, high-end stylists and salon owners who seek to understand the products you are using and do not fall for marketing hype. You tend to gravitate towards the highest quality, best performing products available, and you expect to receive complete information about them.

Many of your clients, for their part, wish to be informed about the chemical content of products used on their hair. Some may be concerned about formaldehyde, and have probably heard about “formaldahyde free” products. We suggest you explain to your clients the difference between “formaldehyde-free” and “chemical-free.” Go over the potential risks of using a true Brazilian Keratin formula, and demonstrate how you have salon safety protocols in place to protect them. They will appreciate your professionalism – and they will love their hair!

wen products review

Posted on June 1, 2010 at 11:55 PM Comments comments (0)

THIS POST IS FOR MY BELOVED FRIEND LAURA,SHE SAW THE ADVERTISMENT ON TV AND SHE SAID ,SHE WANT IT TO BUY IT.

ALSO SOME OF MY CLIENTS USES IT

WELL I WILL PUT THE INGREDIENTS AND YOU GET A CONCLUSION!

RULE NUMBER ONE TRY DO NOT TO BUY NOTHING THAT YOU CAN NOT EASYLY PRONOUNCE!!!!!!!!

WEN® Sweet Almond Mint Cleansing Conditioner

Water (Aqua), Glycerin, Cetyl Alcohol, Cetearyl Alcohol, Chamomilla Recutita (Matricaria) Flower Extract, Prunus Serotina (Wild Cherry) Bark Extract, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Extract, Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Oil, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Hydrolyzed Wheat, Protein, Panthenol, Butylene Glycol, Behentrimonium Methosulfate, Stearamidopropyl Dimethylamine, Polysorbate 60, PEG-60 Almond Glycerides, Amodimethicone, Citric Acid, Menthol, Methylchloroisothiazolinone, Methylisothiazolinone, Fragrance (Parfum, Limonene.

WEN® Sweet Almond Mint Styling Crème

Water (Aqua), Propylene Glycol, Cyclopentasiloxane, Cyclotetrasiloxane, Phenyl Trimethicone, Polyacrylamide, Dimethiconol, C13-14 Isoparaffin, Laureth-7, Panthenol, Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Fruit Extract, Butylene Glycol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Benzoic Acid, Dehydroacetic Acid, Phenoxyethanol, Fragrance (Parfum), Citral, Citronellol, Hydroxycitronellal, Butylphenyl Methylpropional, Linalool.

WEN® Sweet Almond Mint Re-Moist Intensive Hair Repair Mask

Water (Aqua), Cetyl Alcohol, Cetearyl Alcohol,Glyceri, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter), Stearamidopropyl Dimethylamine, Chamomilla Recutita (Matricaria) Flower Extract, Portulaca Oleracea Extract, Prunus Serotina (Wild Cherry) Bark Extract, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Oil, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Hydrogenated Coconut Oil, Gardenia Tahitensis Flower, Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein, Panthenol, Butylene Glycol, Amodimethicone, Behentrimonium Methosulfate, Polysorbate 60, PEG-60 Almond Glycerides, Citric Acid, Methylchloroisothiazolinone, Methylisothiazolinone, Menthol, Fragrance (Parfum), Limonene, Hexyl Cinnamal, Annatto (CI 75120).

WEN® Sweet Almond Mint Texture Balm

Ricinus Communis (Castor) Seed Oil, Cyclopentasiloxane, Beeswax, Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Paraffin, Euphorbia Cerifera (Candelilla) Wax, Sorbitan Oleate, Propylparaben, Canola Oil Glyceride, Zea Mays (Corn) Oil, Citric Acid, TBHQ, Propylene Glycol, Fragrance (Parfum), Citronellol, Coumarin, Eugenol, Alpha-Isomethyl Ionone, Geraniol, Limonene, Linalool.

Glycerin: provides moisturizing benefits to the hair. One of the best humectants and has natural moisturizing properties.

Chamomile Extract: designed to help add sheen and highlights. Used for its soothing, calming properties.

Cherry Bark: designed to bring out color, shine & softness in all shades of natural and color-treated hair. Formulated to help with the manageability of your hair.

Rosemary Extract: designed to condition, tone and strengthen hair. Is an invigorating toner and astringent.

Panthenol: helps to promote and restore resilience. A penetrating moisturizer that plumps the hair shaft to make it appear thicker. Designed to reduce split ends, smooth, strengthen and seal in moisture.

Sweet almond oil: designed to contribute conditioning and glide to hair, as well as a conditioned feel to the skin. Softens, soothes and is an excellent moisturizer for the hair.

THE COLOR OF LIGHT AND YOUR HAIR

Posted on December 8, 2009 at 7:25 PM Comments comments (0)

You already know that the type of light falling on your hair affects the color that your hair appears to be, and you've probably noticed that the lighter the color of your hair, the more influence different lighting types have on your color. You may also know that light has a "color" temperature. Sunlight is considered "natural" light and is our reference point for all other types of light. The color temperature of sunlight at midday is about 5500 degrees Kelvin (K). Even the color of sunlight can swing dramatically based on time of day and atmospheric conditions. Whether a light appears "warmer" or "cooler" than natural sunlight depends on whether it's color temperature is above or below that of sunlight. The Kelvin scale was started in the late 1800s, when the British physicist William Kelvin heated a block of carbon to produce a range of different glowing colors at different temperatures. The black cube produced a dim red light that turned a brighter yellow as the temperature went up, and eventually produced a bright blue-white glow at the highest temperatures. In his honor, color temperatures are measured in degrees Kelvin, which are a variation on Centigrade degrees. Instead of starting at the temperature water freezes, the Kelvin scale starts at "absolute zero," which is -273 Centigrade. (Subtract 273 from a Kelvin temperature, and you get the equivalent in Centigrade.) However, the color temperatures attributed to different types of lights are correlated based on visible colors matching a standard black body, and are not the actual temperature at which a filament burns. How's that for more than you ever wanted to know about degrees Kelvin? In general, the higher the color temperature, the more "cool" or blue the light appears. The lower the color temperature, the "warmer" or more yellow the light appears. The temperature of the light in our salon depends on time of day, but ranges between 3200 and 5500 K. During the day, the light is usually around 5000 K; made up from sunlight at around 5500 K, and a lessor amount of quartz halogen, which is about 3200 K. In the evening when the sun goes down, the light in the salon is around 3200 K, a bit more "warm" looking than midday sun. If you get your color done in the salon at night and then look at that color outside in daylight the next day, your color is going to look just a little bit "cooler" outside. If you get your hair done here in the day under lighting that is about 5000 K and then go to your office, which is lit by fluorescent bulbs at around 6300K, your hair is going to look "cooler" in the office. If on the other hand, you get your hair done here during the day under lighting that is about 5000K and look at it at home under incandescent lighting at around 2600K, your hair will look considerably "warmer" or more golden at home. Household incandescent light is one of the "warmest" or yellowest artificial lighting sources you are likely to encounter other than candles or a fireplace. You can purchase bulbs to achieve just about any color temperature you may want in the rooms of your house.

The chart below illustrates the range of lighting in degrees Kelvin.

Skylight (blue sky) 12,000K - 20,000K

Average summer shade 8000K

Light summer shade 7100K Typical summer light (sun + sky) 6500K

Daylight fluorescent 6300K

Overcast sky 6000K

Clear mercury lamp 5900K

Sunlight (noon, summer, mid-latitudes) 5400K

Design white fluorescent 5200K

Special fluorescents used for color evaluation 5000K

Daylight photoflood 4800 - 5000K

Sunlight (early morning and late afternoon) 4300K

Brite White Deluxe Mercury lamp 4000K Sunlight (1 hour after dawn) 3500K

Cool white fluorescent 3400K

Photoflood 3400K

Professional tungsten photographic lights 3200K 100-watt tungsten halogen 3000K

Deluxe Warm White fluorescent 2950K 100-watt

incandescent 2870K 40-watt incandescent 2500K

High-pressure sodium light 2100K

Sunlight (sunrise or sunset) 2000K

Candle flame 1850K - 1900K

Match flame 1700K

So the moral of this story is; if you're really particular about the color hue of your hair, take into consideration where you want it to appear ideal. Out at night with lots of warm, yellow lights typical of clubs and people's houses? Or in an office environment that may have much cooler lighting? Or in the sun? The difference isn't huge, but there is a difference.

JUST FOR MEN

Posted on November 18, 2009 at 7:41 PM Comments comments (0)

Hair Color Designed Just For Men

 

The image of youth and vitality are becoming essential for climbing the corporate ladder in today’s competitive business world. Studies have shown that men with gray hair command lower salaries compared to their non-gray counterparts and are considered less effective.

As a result, many men are looking into hair color as a way of camouflaging gray or dull hair. Hair color, properly applied, can brighten natural hair color, conceal a percentage of the gray or remove all traces of graying hair.

 

In the past, men have run into several problems when attempting hair coloring services.

1.Improper application, usually “home hair color” can result in a shade that is the wrong color, too dark or too solid to appear natural.

 

2.Salon tinting can require 20 to 45 minutes of processing time. Many men are uncomfortable sitting in the salon for that amount of time with the color preparation on their hair.

 

3.Even when properly applied, hair color can turn unnaturally red or gold from exposure to the sun or over time as it fades. This makes the added hair color painfully obvious and is unacceptable to most men.

 

 MiN Hair Color  is designed specifically for men and while available only through hair care professionals, it seems to solve many of the previous problems.

 

1.There are ten shades that can be mixed by the hairdresser to achieve the perfect color match.

2.MiN (short for minutes) processes in only 3-5 minutes, depending on the level of coverage being sought. This time can be spent relaxing inconspicuously at the shampoo bowl. No sitting under the hairdryer or wearing a processing cap.

3.MiN is designed to resist fading to gold or red and to stay true to tone.

 

I think this product deserves a thumbs up.

Min Hair Color appears that it may be the perfect solution to keeping a youthful and competitive image in the work place while eliminating the previous problems.

 

 

 

COLOR by MiN New York, Pepper

Quick. Easy. Natural. The MiN New York Touch Up Color Kit.

MiN New York was founded on Color for salon professionals, now you can enjoy excellent results in just 5 MiNutes

Recognized by Men's Health Magazine in "100 Rules of Looking Great!"

Kit includes:

• Catalyst (activator)

• Color

• Blocker (selective color blocking agent)

• Applicator brush and gloves

• 2oz Travel WASH Shampoo • Detailed Instructions

 

Lunar Chart & Hair Care

Posted on November 5, 2009 at 11:08 PM Comments comments (0)

Lunar Chart & Hair Care The Lunar Chart displays the 5 optimal dates each month for cutting and beautifying hair. Certain days are especially beneficial for a certain task and are noted on the calendar in red. In addition, there are dates each season of particular importance. Below the haircutting chart is our chart for retarding growth — the best days for shaving, plucking, and waxing.

Note: Dates are calculated for Pacific Standard Time, Northern Hemisphere.

best days for beneficial haircutting in 2009...March 19 -21 - Spring Equinox — are the best dates to cut for spring.

June 18-20 — Summer Solstice — are the best dates to cut for summer.

September 3-5 — Fall Equinox — are the best dates to cut for fall.

December 3-5 — Winter Solstice — are the best dates to cut for winter.

Shown are the optimal days in each month for performing the tasks shown at the top of each column. In addition, a particular day or days each month is considered most beneficial and is indicated in red. The Equinoxes and Solstices are bordered.


https://morroccomethod.com/lunar-hair-chart

 



 

HOW MINERALS AFFECT YOUR HAIR?

Posted on December 21, 2008 at 2:04 AM Comments comments (0)

July 11, 2008

Chlorine:

Chlorine is an element used to kill bacteria in drinking water and pools, and as an active bleach to remove pigment in color. Chlorine can discolor hair, damage the cuticle and protein, and create an oxidizing effect on elements in the hair. Active chlorine can leave hair feeling gummy when wet, and straw-like when dry. Chlorine can alter the electrical charge on minerals in the hair, causing them to bond stronger to the hair, and may even change the color of certain minerals. The highly charged mineral may, in turn, damage and/or discolor the hair.

Bromine:
Used like chlorine, especially in hot pools, such as whirlpools and spas.
How Minerals Get Into WaterGround water and surface water are the sources of water for homes and businesses.Ground water comes from under the ground. Both domestic and community wells derive their water from rain passing through aquifers, which are layers of minerals.
The acidity (pH below 7.0) of the rain increases the dissolving effect of minerals; therefore, these dissolved solids are found in the water when pumped above groundand used in bathing.
Surface water comes from rivers or lakes, usually containing fewer minerals because the water has not filtered down through the mineral layers. Unfortunately, increasingpopulations are polluting the water, which causes additional bacterial growth. This growth is controlled at treatment facilities by adding chlorine to kill bacteria, and then adding lime (a calcium compound) to help control chlorine levels.

How Minerals Can Attach on to Your HairMinerals affecting the hair are charged positive. This attachment createsa "wall" of minerals on the protein, blocking solutions, preventing proper penetration of color, perm, and relaxer. Minerals found in water at home are continuously exposedto the hair during bathing. Since hot or warm water is usually selected to wash hair, the cuticle is opened, allowing positively charged elements, such as minerals, to get inside the cuticle and attach to the protein.


How Minerals Can Affect Hair

Calcium Effect on HairThis mineral is in most of the water in the United States and unfortunately, causes serious problems not usually recognized by most professional stylists andtheir clients.

Mineralized calcium is found naturally in the ground, especially where limestone is present. Calcium (also known as lime) is injected into most water systemsas part of the water treatment process.

Three ways calcium affects hair:

Calcium builds up on the hair, leaving the hair feeling dry and weighted down. It can even cause perms to be relaxed.
Calcium salts build up on the scalp and cause flaking, often know as dandruff. These deposits are much like the "bathtub ring" associated with hard water and bath soap.
Calcium "build-up" can clog the hair at the mouth of the follicle, causing the hair tobreak off, and may coat the scalp, blocking further hair growth.

Copper: This mineral bonds strongly to the hair and originates either from underground water, particles from copper water pipes, or most commonly, copper sulfates added to pool and drinking water to control algae growth. Oxidized copper discolors light hair,producing a green tint, and causes dark hair to tint darker. It can weigh hair down, and also cause problems in perms, colors, and relaxers.

Iron: Found usually in well water in areas that have concentrations of iron in the ground. Concentrations of iron will slowly cause hair to tint darker, add weight to the hair, and prevent proper chemical processing. Heavy amounts of iron will tint light-coloredhair orange and cause dark hair to become darker with red highlights. Oxidized iron actually functions as an oxidizer in hair in much the same way that mildperoxide attacks the hair. It may cause an excessive dry feeling in the hair and may actually change the textural appearance of the hair.

Magnesium: Magnesium is abundant in the soil and is very much a part of the mineral complex associated with hard water. Like calcium, magnesium attaches tothe hair, leaving it feeling dry and weighted down.

Silica: Sand-like substance found in areas of volcanic or desert-like areas. It is usually bound to calcium or magnesium and forms very hard, virtually insolubledeposits on surfaces. Water borne silica can build up on the hair, causing the same effect as calcium - dryness, dandruff, weight, and hair loss.

Lead: Lead acetate is used in certain home remedy gray cover-ups, such as Grecian Formula. This element can build up, leaving the hair feeling dry and preventing proper chemical services, such as perms and colors, from processing properly.

http://www.malibu2000.com/content/default.aspx

A HAIR STYLE, IS IT MATTER OF ATTITUD?

Posted on December 21, 2008 at 1:52 AM Comments comments (0)

February 16, 2008

I LOVE RED...
RED COLOR IS A MATTER OF ATTITUD!
I THINK YOU NEED TO HAVE PERSONALITY TO CARRY ANY COLOR... THAT IS THE REASON WHY FASHION IS NOT ALWAYS TRUE PARAMETER OF WHAT IS GOOD FOR YOU IS GOOD FOR EVERY BODY...
YOUR LIFE STYLE,PERSONALITY,FACIAL FEATURES, SKIN COLOR,ECONOMIC FACTS,TIME,MAINTENANSE, PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLL ABOUT WHAT IS UNIC FOR YOU,AND ONLY FOR YOU.THIS
MANY TIMES WE HAVE A FANTASY ABOUT A HAIR DO,STYLE OR COLOR AND WE CUT ,TAKE,LOOK FOR PICTURES AS A REFERENCE ;WHICH IS OK UNTILL CERTAIN POINT, BECAUSE YOU NEED TO THINK ABOUT THE FACT WHAT IS BEHIND THAT PICTURE ,MEANING TIME AND THE SPECIALIST TO BLOW DRY AND DO THE MAKE UP; THE LIGHTS AND SET ,THE COMPUTER SOFTWARE AND THE WHOLD PRODUCTION FOR IT ;PLUS THE TYPE OF HAIR THAT THE MODEL HAS IS DIFERENT OF WHAT YOU HAVE...THIS IS COMMON.
COMING BACK TO THE FANTASY THING ,WE DREAM ABOUT IT AND WHEN WE HAVE IT DONE, WE REALIZE THAT WE DONT FIT WITH IT...
THE PICTURES ARE OK FOR A LIMITED DESCRIPTION;BUT WHAT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU KNOW IS WHAT EVER YOU DONT LIKE AND WHAT EVER YOU HAVE OR YOU DONT WANT TO HAVE AS A STARTING POINT.
THE CONSULTATION IS VERY IMPORTANT TO KNOW ALL THOSE FACTS, AND ALSO TO TEST HOW COMFORTABLE YOU FEEL ABOUT THE PROFFESIONAL,WHAT IS THE BETTER METHOD TO GET IT DONE AND ALSO WHAT THE STYLIST CAN SUGGEST OR NEGOCIATE SPECIAL FOR YOU.
AH ! AND DONT FORGUET ABOUT DONT DO BIG CHANGES WHEN YOU ARE EMOTIONAL INASTABLE , TRUST YOU WILL REGRETED.
AND ANOTHER TIP FOR THE SINGLES , TRY TO DONT DRASTICAL CHANGE YOUR HAIR WHEN YOU KNEW SOMEBODY AND WENT INTO A DATE ALREADY... HE MEET YOU WITH YOUR ACTUAL HAIR BUT YOU CAN ENHACE IT NOT CHANGE IT
I AM TELLING YOU BY EXPERIENCE , I DID IT WITHOUT THINKING AND I REALIZED IT WHEN MY DATE ASKED ME WITH HORROR :WHAT DID YOU DO TO YOUR HAIR..
WELL THINK ABOU IT...
SORRY ABOUT SPELLING I AM DOING MY BEST...

 

BRIGTH RED HAIR;

THIS IS MY STYLE!





























WHAT MAKES THE HAIR STRAIGHT?

Posted on December 21, 2008 at 1:50 AM Comments comments (0)

March 22, 2008

http://stuff.mit.edu/people/melissar/www/ugthesis.pdf

Designing a Better Hair Straightener
by
Melissa B. Read
SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING IN PARTIAL FUFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
AT THE
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
JUNE 2004
©2004 Melissa B. Read. All rights reserved.
The author hereby grants to MIT permission to reproduce
and to distribute publicly paper and electronic
copies of this thesis document in whole or in part

http://stuff.mit.edu/people/melissar/www/ugthesis.pdf

HAIR FACTS

Posted on December 21, 2008 at 1:47 AM Comments comments (0)

September 19, 2008

A collection of some interesting, quirky bits of hair trivia. Enjoy!

  • Hair is dead protein once it has appeared from your scalp.
  • Hair is a reflection on the overall condition of your body. A healthy strand of hair should stretch by about 30% before it breaks.
  • Each hair on your body comes equipped with a tiny muscle that can make it stand upright.
  • The average number of hairs on the head is 100,000.
  • Hair is the fastest growing tissue in the body, second only to bone marrow.
  • Asian hair grows the fastest, has the greatest elasticity and, and is least prone to balding.
  • Hair grows faster in warm weather.
  • Female hair grows more slowly than male hair.
  • Male hair is denser than female hair.
  • 90% of scalp hairs are growing and 10% are resting.
  • It is normal to lose 100 hairs per day from the scalp.
  • Elderly people have slower hair growth and diminished hair density. Over 50% of men by age 50 have male pattern hair loss. And over 40% of women by the time they reach menopause will have female pattern hair loss.
  • In ancient Egypt, the priests plucked every single hair from their bodies, including their eyebrows and eyelashes.
  • Humans have about the same number of hair follicles as a chimpanzee has.
  • Trichotillomania (TTM), is a problem characterized by the repeated urge to pull out hair fibers mainly from the scalp, though the focus can also be on pulling eyebrows, eyelashes, beard, nose, pubic or other body hair. It is a condition in which the affected individual plucks or pulls out their own hair resulting in bald patches. The general causes of Trichotillomania may be anxiety disorders or mood problems.
  • Traction alopecia is also a hair-pulling disorder. But here the cause may involve things like tight hat bands or tight braids. If bands are used to tie tight pony tails, or cornrow hair styles are used then the roots of the hair are pulled on (traction). And when the traction continues for a long time and the same hair is repeatedly stressed, then the hair sheds off and the follicles in the skin can become damaged. The hair may eventually stop growing leading to permanent scarring alopecia. Traction alopecia is a substantial risk in hair weaves, which are usually worn either to conceal hair loss, or purely for cosmetic purposes.
  • Uncombable Hair Syndrome (UHS) is a rare disease in which the hair grows in silvery-blond or straw-colored, stands out straight from the scalp and is impossispiky hairble to comb. Affected hair is dry, curly, brittle, and progressively uncombable, eventually taking on a “spangled” or shimmery appearance, most likely due to the reflection of light off the irregular surface of the shaft and only scalp hair is affected. It is normally seen in early infancy and childhood and is most likely to disappear as a person grows up.